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Uniform, Building Myself a Cardigan

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A soon as I laid eyes on this cardigan, I knew I needed (wanted) one. Badly. The design is by Carrie Bostick Hoge and is not just for one cardigan, but allows you to customise your own version. It can be made into a short or long version, three body shapes (fitted, A-line or straight), with fitted or bell shaped sleeves, a simple or shaped neckband and with patch or inset pockets. The variations are sheer endless, and there is room for some improvisation as well. I am going for a short, A-line cardigan with inset pockets, bell sleeves and a shaped collar. I’m certain other combinations are bound to be tried later. The instructions are easy to follow and the different options clearly laid out. Definitely a useful pattern to have in one’s library.

I am knitting my Uniform cardigan in Rowan Felted Tweed DK. Maybe not the most artisanal yarn around, but there is still much to love: when you knit it, it feels a little coarse which I like, when you wash it, it softens beautifully. It has great yardage (175 m for 50 g) and it comes in the most gorgeous, rustic tweedy shades.

I have finished the pockets and the side shaping and am almost ready to start on the sleeves.

From time to time, the sun peaks out between rain laden February skies. To escape those, at least in mind, I’m (re)reading Agatha Christie’s A Caribbean Mystery, its main attraction being Miss Marple knitting on a warm, sunny terrace or beach.

She would rest for ten minutes or so, and then she would take her knitting and walk slowly along towards the hotel and she would settle herself. On the terrace overlooking the sea? Or should she go on to the bathing beach to watch the bathers and the children? Usually it was the latter. In the afternoon, after her rest, she might take a drive. It really didn’t matter very much.

And it really doesn’t require very much imagination to see myself doing the same…

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